“Souffrons donc l’affection subite du langage.”

“It is a good direction to believe that this language which is so scored and impressed by the commotion of all of us since its birth can be arranged to in its turn impress significantly for the good of each individual. Let us endure the sudden affection of the language.”
W.S. Graham, ‘Notes on a Poetry of Release’ 

“C’est une bonne direction, celle qui consiste à croire que ce langage, depuis sa naissance si marqué, si creusé par notre brouhaha collectif, peut être disposé de manière à laisser à son tour une impression significative pour le bien de chaque individu. Souffrons donc l’affection subite du langage.”
W.S. Graham, “Notes sur une poésie de la libération”.
(traduction Anne-Sylvie Homassel)

extrait de Les Dialogues obscurs, poèmes choisis, W.S. Graham (Black Herald Press, 2013)
excerpt from The Dark Dialogues, selected poems, W.S. Graham (Black Herald Press, 2013)

http://blackheraldpress.wordpress.com/books/les-dialogues-obscurs-the-dark-dialogues-w-s-graham/

Les Dialogues obscurs

Les Dialogues obscurs

Darkscapes – Anne-Sylvie Salzman

Darkscapes

Darkscapes

Darkscapes
by Anne-Sylvie Salzman
Translated by William Charlton
Tartarus Press, 2013

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“Narrative and story can lead us to visions of that which is impossible — that which can drive us mad, or make us feel as if we already are mad. The horror story in particular offers the possibility of a temporary release from sanity and safety. The fifteen stories in ‘Darkscapes‘ by Anne-Sylvie Salzman, translated from the French by William Charlton, offer a literary taste of madness, an intense inversion of reason that is powerful, sometimes unknowable, and almost always unforgettable. Salzman is the perfect 21st-century bride for Edgar Allen Poe. ” (Rick Kleffel)
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Anne-Sylvie Salzman (aka Anne-Sylvie Homassel) is a Paris-based writer and translator. She co-directs Le Visage vert, a literary magazine and small press devoted to supernatural fiction. She is the author of Sommeil (José Corti), Au bord d’un lent fleuve noir (Joëlle Losfeld) and Lamont (Le Visage vert). Amongst other novels and collections, she translated Max Beerbohm’s Seven Men, Lord Dunsany’s The Sword of Welleran, Ernest Bramah’s Max Carrados and Arthur Machen’s Three Impostors—and some of W.S. Graham’s poetry, feats she is inanely proud of. She is currently working on a science-fiction novel.
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Rimbaud in Java

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Rimbaud in Java, The lost voyage, by Jamie James (Editions Didier Millet, 2011)

à paraître prochainement en français (Editions du Sonneur, traduction de Anne-Sylvie Homassel)

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For over a century almost nothing was known about what Rimbaud did and where he went while he was in Java. Now Editions Didier Millet, the small press based in Singapore and Paris, has published Rimbaud in Java, the new book by Jamie James, the first book devoted to the poet’s lost voyage to the Far East. James, an American novelist and critic resident in Indonesia since 1999, reviews everything that is known about this mysterious episode. To fill in the tantalizing gaps, he imaginatively reconstructs what the poet must have seen and informed speculation about what he might have done on his voyage to the tropics, vividly recreating life in nineteenth century Java along the way. Rimbaud in Java concludes with an inquiry into what the Orient represented in the poet’s imagination, with a scandalous, amusing sketch history of French orientalism.

To read more about the book: http://www.rimbaudinjava.com/

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More about Arthur Rimbaud

Rimbaud and the New Inquisition (by Paul Stubbs)

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